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to extradite iraq that if you did to rise president after he was sentenced to death in a set -- in absentia. the turkish prime minister said hashimi can stay in turkey as long as he wants to. james reynolds has this. >> tariq al hashimi is meant to be on death row in baghdad, but instead we met him at a hotel in turkey. iraq that the vice-president dismissed the iraqi court that a verdict. >> the verdict was not -- from -- was not a surprise to me. i thought this verdict to be taken by this unreliable trial. >> this is the man he blames for the verdict, iraq that the prime minister, north al-maliki. the two men lead iraq that a rival communities of sunnis and shias. iraq's vice president said he was prepared to go back to iraq under two conditions. >> i am ready any time, provided that security is prepared for me. and fair trial. >> does it mean the trial without the government of north al-maliki? >> the problem we are facing, james -- the case of the accusation. let us talk about how to put an end or how to find a suitable exit for the current political impasse we are facing. >> the presen
themselves don't know. they are making this up as they go along. lara and i saw this in iraq when we were recovering that conflict. at the start of the conflict many of those who were fighting in the name of saddal hussein regarded the jihadist with a kind of contempt. gradually they became allies and the next thing you know they are not ridinged tiger, the tiger was riding them and the jihaddists had taken over the fight. then of course there was a long period. >> then you had the awakening to split them apart. >> so there is an arc to these events. and hopefully if these things are inevitable, hopefully that arc is shortened. and the syrians learn from the iraqi experience and the next revolution overlearns from them. >> where are we with respect to iraq today, not some of we, where is iraq today. >> it's a country still trying to find a way to work different elements of that society are trying to work with each other. there is too much pent up resentment among the shiite force the sunnies there is a relatively new resentment among the sunnis of the shiites and they are still trying too
in building hospitals. they also pledge to work to promote export to iraq and to train personnel to operate such devices. >> e will work with the japanese government to raise iraq's medical capabilities. >> the equipment maker official added that his company hopes to provide the devices that will best suit iraq's needs. the japanese government has proposed a second site for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from the accident at the fukushima nuclear plant. on thursday, senior environment minister visited the governor which borders foesh ukushima to south. suggested as a site, the national forest in the prefecture and explained the forest is far from residential areas, offers sufficient space and topographically and geologically stable. the governor replied he needs to consult with local residents and municipalities as the matter is very important to them. later he visited the city hall and met with the mayor to seek his cooperation. he is firmly oppose to the government's proposal. local residents also have mixed feelings. >> i understand there must be a site some where. i can't c
in geneva. in addition to the foreign ministers of the permanent five we had qatar, kuwait, turkey and iraq there, with the secretaries general of the arab league and the u.n.. and the whole idea was to review syria, not in the competitive sort of where this group supports but to come together to see how we can move forward. and we agreed on the need for political transition and political settlement. and came up with guidelines and principleses for political-- if you wish a road map basically saying there has to be an interim government, an interim government that will have full executive power. we need to try and maintain the security forces so that people will be protected and particularly in a situation where they also have chemical weapons. that has to be protected. as well as insurance that governmental institutions do not collapse. nobody wants a chaotic collapse. and everybody agreed. all, and they were to come to new york and endorse that agreement. that has not been done yet. >> why not? >> i think when they got to new york they did not focus on building on that substantive gain in
is iraq. it's just the twin sister. it's a ba'athist regime ruling a multiethnic society. iraq had a sunni minority ruling a shiite majority with kurds and other minorities on the side. syria has a shiite minority ruling a sunni majority with kurds and other minorities. they are mirror images of each other. now, what happened in iraq was we pulled the pin. we removed the dictator at the top and that led to an explosion sand what american did in iraq was the geopolitical equivalent >> rose: we weren't prepared for what would happen after we removed the pin. >> but then we did the geopolitical equivalent of falling on a grenade. we absorbed the entire explosion. we iraqis most of all. i'm saying our presence there prevented it from becoming a regional conflagration. and we then presided over-- largely because of originally-- but in many cases it was probably inevitable a civil war as the parties contested the new balance of power. we let them each test each other. they finally reached a point of exhaustion and balance. we then midwife add social contract between them and on the margins with
on iraq and saddam hussein. eichenwald writes -- >> to talk about the significance of these findings, we're joined by the author himself, kurt eichenwald, an award winning journalist and contributing editor at "vanity fair." his of a guest today is called, "the deafness before the storm." his latest book, "500 days: secrets and lies in the terror wars." we welcome you to "democracy now!" lay out the chronology for us but a lot of people know august 6, 2001, right before the september 11 attacks, explain then that memo and how you went back. >> that is the way to look at this, which is backwards. in 2004, the 9/11 commission hearings were saying, we want to see these presidential daily greeks. the bush administration fought releasing them. they finally released the august 61, which now have the infamous headline "bin laden determined to strike u.s.." in her testimony, condoleezza rice, the national security adviser at the time, said this was merely a historical document, a review of bin laden and al qaeda and what they've done. when you read it, that is what it was. it was also a red herr
for their role in the deaths of prisoners in iraq and afghanistan. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. mitt romney accepted the republican presidential nomination thursday night with a vow to revive the u.s. economy and a plea to voters disappointed with president obama's first term. >> how many days have you woken up thinking something special was happening in america? many of you felt that way on election day four years ago. hope and change had a powerful appeal. tonight ask a simple question. if you felt that excitement when you voted for barack obama, shouldn't you feel that way now that he is president obama? [applause] you know there's something wrong with the kind of job his son as president and the best feeling you had was the day you voted for him. >> we will have more from romney's speech after the headlines. the justice department has announced it will not prosecute anyone involved in the killing and torturing of prisoners in cia custody after a three-year investigation. the justice depar
soldier in iraq. the soldier was born in oklahoma to welsh mother and u.s. navy father read his parents fell in love. his father was stationed at the u.s. military base in wales. the soldier showed early promise as a boy, winning top prizes at science fairs three years in a row. he believed in the truth. like all of us, he hated hypocrisy. he believed in the party and the right for all of us to pursue happiness. he believed in the values that founded an independent united states. he believes and medicine, justice, and pain. like many teenagers, he was unsure what to do with his life. he knew he wanted to defend his country. he knew he wanted to learn about the world. he entered the u.s. military, and like his father, trained as an intelligence analyst. in late 2009, age 21, he was deployed to iraq. there, it is alleged, he sought u.s. military that did not often follow the rule of law and she sought u.s. military that did not often follow the rule of law. it is alleged it was there in baghdad in 2010 that he gave to wikileaks, gave to me, and alleged he gave to the world details that ex
on drugs? >> if you look at the timing, of the war in iraq happened, and then we started spending more time talking about the war on iraq and afghanistan, and the war on drugs was no longer front and center. no powerful interest group wanting to end the insanity of the war on france -- drugs. that is leading to half a million people going to jail for non-of violent and drug offenses, and the result of incarceration rates is we have millions of people who are felons and disenfranchised for life, so the unintended consequences are enormous and long-lasting, and what is interesting is the people are ahead of the politicians. over 90% of people believe treatment is more affective, and yet politicians are worried they are going to be perceived as weak on crime. they are continuing to fight a war we are never going to win. >> the third issue covered at these shadow conventions beyond poverty and drugs is a corrupt and -- is the corruption of politics by money. i cannot imagine -- i wish i were there to hear the conversations going on about money in politics this time around to given the supreme c
of mass destruction were never found in iraq. good his foreign policy centered on going into iraq and getting rid of those weapons of mass destruction was alive. his administration showed remarkable indifference to the plight of most americans. what happened in new orleans and katrina is a good example. mitt romney and the republicans would like to pretend the and ministration did not happen. taking a five trillion $10-year surplus bequeaths to it by the clinton administration and turning into a a giant new deficit and saying to wall street, do whever you want. we are not going to look at you. he makes the case against mitt romney. that is one of the most important things. and with that kind of cynicism, the special interests to win everything. the only thing we can get our democracy back is if we understand we have got to be active, and it is not just paying taxes and serving on juries and showing up. we have got to be engaged, mobilize, energized. we have got to demand this work for us as ordinary people, as average working americans who need an economy working for us, not just
. -- in benghazi wrecked. the wave of anti-americanism rolled on through the region. in yemen. in iraq, they burned the stars and stripes, chanting "no to america, no to israel." meanwhile in egypt, police fired tear gas at demonstrators in a third day of unrest. democracy in north africa, halted by the west, facing to radical anti-western groups that were once suppressed by the ubiquitous security forces. soon after last year's uprising in libya, we went to a newly liberated town, famous or notorious for sending an unusually high number of young muslims and to fight american forces in iraq. some former soldiers return to their own country last year, joining revolutionary militias, and keeping their weapons even after gaddafi was overthrown. s he says he knows the group' influenced but -- influenced by al-qaeda were behind the attack on the u.s. consulate. >> it is first hand information. it is direct information. they believe libya cannot be a hub for the conflict. but it should be used or utilize as a backyard for a logistic space for a bigger fatah, which is egypt or syria or maybe both of them
, the americans were telling us unless we authorize the use of force against iraq, we would be on the wrong part of history. and it turns out to be that there was no anthrax in that file. >> rose: okay. a program note the prime minister mario monti was scheduled to be on our program, he will be on our program tomorrow night. tonight the prime minister of russia. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: sergey lavrov is here, he has served as russia's foreign minister since 204. he is in new york for the united nations general assembly. the conflict in syria is an essential focus. president obama spoke about the issue earlier today. >> in syria, the future must not belong to a dictator who massacres his people. if there's a cause that cries out for protest in the world today, peaceful protest. in a regime that tortures children and shoots rockets at apartment buildings. we must remain engaged to assure that what began with citizens demanding the rights does not end in the cycle of sectarian violence. together we must stand wit
from iraq and the planned drawdown from afghanistan. in a theme he touched on throughout his speech, obama said the "change" he promised four years ago would take time, but was surely underway. >> our problems can be solved. our challenges can be met. the path we offer may be harder, but it leads to a better place and i'm asking you to choose that future. >> we will have more from president obama's speech after the headlines and host the debate. at least 50 people i've been killed in a pair of earthquakes in southwestern china. the chinese government says the quakes damaged thousands of buildings, displacing some 20,000 people. the united nations food agency says global prices have stabilized at levels near those of the 2008 crisis that sparked unrest across the globe. ahead of the food and agriculture organization said international action could prevent a crisis in part by addressing the harsh impact of the recent u.s. drought. >> there is a risk of more price increases, but at the moment, there is no evidence to suggest that is an inevitability. the very sharp reduction in u.s. pr
the compound's main gate. protests have also occurred in other countries including egypt, iraq, iran, tunisia, and bangladesh as well as the gaza strip. in cairo, at least 13 demonstrators were injured today outside the u.s. embassy. police reportedly used tear gas to disperse the protesters after they threw stones and molotov cocktails. the protests follow tuesday night's storming of the was consulate in the libyan city of benghazi that left the u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three staffers dead. on wednesday, president obama vowed to bring to justice those responsible for the killings, which he said would not repeat ties between u.s. and libya. >> we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others, but there is absolutely no justification to this type of senseless violence. none. the world must stand at a to unequivocally reject these brutal acts. already, many libyans have joined us in doing so. this attack will not break the bonds between u.s. and libya. >> the obama administration has dispatched an elite group of marines to the libyan capital of tripoli and six u
.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. more than 100 people were killed in iraq on sunday and one of the country's deadliest days this year. a series of bombings hit baghdad shortly after fugitive iraqi vice president was sentenced to death for allegedly planning and funding attacks in iraq. a leading sunni muslim politician, he fled baghdad in december when iraq's shia-led government accused him of running death squads. he has denied the charges, saying they're politically motivated. the controversy has sparked fears of worsening the sectarian turmoil between shiites and sunnis. in sunday's worst attack, more than 50 people were killed when a bomb struck a crowded commercial area. the u.s. has formally handed control of the bagram air base to the afghan government and a key milestone for the more than a decade-long a to occupation. but despite the handover, the u.s. is continuing to contain control over several dozen prisoners in a dispute the afghan government. "the new york times" reports the spat apparently centers on afghan refusals to adopt the no- trial detention system dem
for possible discipline. iraq is denying reports it allowed iran to fly shipments of weapons and military personnel to in a the regime of syrian president bashar al-assad over iraq airspace. according to reuters, the transfers have been authorized under a deal between top iraqi and iranian officials. on wednesday, senator john kerry of massachusetts warned iraq the alleged flights could jeopardize u.s. aid. at the united nations, secretary-general ban ki-moon said syria would top the agenda at the general assembly in new york next week. >> every morning when i watch tv and images, whenever i see many people, particularly young children, who are affected by this, i could not start my day with a peace of mind. it really affects me deeply. as you know, and unfortunately, the government and opposition forces seem to be determined to see the end by military means. i think military means [indiscernible] it should be resolved through political dialogue. >> italy's top court has upheld the sentences of 23 cia operatives convicted of kidnapping a muslim cleric under the u.s. program of extraordina
in iraq. rodriguez still needs formal approval from the white house and confirmation from the senate before replacing general carter ham as head of africa command. the obama administration has taken a number of steps to expand u.s. military presence in africa and ramped up the use of covert spying -- operations. the palestinian activist has agreed to end his hunger strike amidst signs of progress in the global campaign for his release. zakaria zubeidi, a former militant turned activist and director of freedom theatre, has been in prison by the palestinian authority since may. he has been on hunger strike some september 9. there were reports he could be released as early as sunday. republican senator scott brown faced democratic challenger elizabeth warren in the first debate of their closely watched massachusetts senate race thursday. brown began by attacking elizabeth warren for claiming on past documents that she is native american. warren defended herself, she had been told growing up in oklahoma that her mother was part delaware and part cherokee. the candidates sparred over a nu
that part of the country, after the earthquake, and what sparked in my head was katrina, iraq, katrina. 250,000 people under the rubble, 80% of the people living on less than $2 a day. wet was the greatest asset possess? human capital. i said, who is going to negotiate with these people. i have been wearing my flag to get a group of people to pay attention to this country. this is the time there is a soft spot and they feel week. who is going to be there for better policies and legislation? i felt with my passion and the youth behind me, i was the man for the job. tavis: there were some technical issues that kept you from running, but how did you perceive the efforts to keep you from the ballot? >> i got bamboozled. not in the sense of being emotional, and in a sense of the law. i was a diplomat five years prior to the current president now, who is a friend of mine with a diplomatic passport, and my title was ambassador at large, so the residency laws do not really apply, because how would you give me a five-year passports if i am not a haitian citizen? the same goes for my uncle who also r
in a military operation in a place like syria, you've got to be prepared, as we learned from iraq and afghanistan, to become the government, and i'm not sure any country, either the united states or i don't hear of anyone else, who's willing to take on that responsibility. the other proposal is to arm the opposition. that's certainly something you can look at, but make sure you know who you're arming and what you're liable to get from that solution. then provide safe havens for people in other countries may be a possibility, but i think stick with the political, diplomatic and economic track for the time being. tavis: again, i'm so tempted to continue picking your brain about these hotspots around the globe, but want to, again, as i promised, get to the text. there are a number of things, a number of political issues, for that matter, decisions that you've made in your life that you finally open up and talk about in the text, which allows me to some degree to continue this line of questioning. for example, you talked for the first time extensively about the un speech, and everybod
in iraq for those-- was not a justification in a clear way-- there was no justification by the u.s. government at that time. and this is what created confusion as far as this position. however the attacks themselves we continue to condemn them. >> rose: as well you should-- as well as you have. i'm aware of that. do you believe the united states-- the principle concern in the arab world about the united states comes from the absence of a palestinian/israeli peace, the afghanistan and the iraqi war and what else? what else is it that the united states has done that you believe must be rectified or put behind the united states in order to have the growing productive intelligent relationship with an arab world that's changing. >> ( translated ): and as an egyptian there's no animosity between us and the people of america this understanding does not exist. however the sensitivity and the worry that the egyptian people the middle east is because of some positions on past u.s. governments in matters that you mentioned with regard to the palestinians with what happened in iraq and in af
, and with the congress in 1944, it was the gi bill, it was with bush 41, it was iraq and the mission to kuwait and doing the right thing in terms of the 1990 budget deal which bill clinton will tell you help set up the prosperity of the 1990s and george herbert walker bush when he broke the read my lips pledge in 1990 he would lose the presidency. >> we continue this evening with a look at president obama from two people who have written extensively about him, they are peter baker of "the new york times" and jonathan alter. >> if you look at it just in terms of his accomplishments, if you go down the list of what got done in the first two years, he obliterates bill clinton in terms of achievements as law is passed which is often the way that presidents are dged, obviously clinton had a better economy and conditions of the country were better, he did better on deficit reduction. >> but in terms of changing the structure of government and laws with long-term impact on all kind of things that people don't even think about from mileage standards to stirring up tens of billions of dollars for student loans,
to take on iraq and afghanistan. al qaeda is nothing more than an interdependent ngo of a very pernicious kind. tavis: interdependence, we heard some of this at the rnc, and we have heard some of that at the democratic convention this week, but speak to me about this notion, this gospel of american exceptionalism that some americans are still preaching. >> tavis, that is such an important question. politicians have to do it. when president obama was elected, he had made a speech where he talked about america is part of the world, and he went to istanbul and cairo in his first year and talked about independence and the need to work together, and he was punished by the media and his own party, and the result is he talks mainly about america, we are number one, god bless america, and i do one god to bless america, but i want them to bless the whole world. the focus on the american exhibition where, first of all, every nation thinks it is exceptional. in switzerland, they talk about it, and in france, they talk about it that the french think similarly. and this does not mean that we are excep
spread to iraq, where almost a decade ago, the delicate transition from dictatorship to democracy in the middle east was meant to have begun. >> we demand that the iraqi government close the american embassy. america must apologize to our parts of the islamic world. >> candle lit tributes in washington for the murder diplomats, with the unknown -- how much will their debts and the badly made film be a turning point in the arab spring? >> tensions are certainly high. we bring you live pictures from cairo. we have had protests and demonstrations that seem to be in relatively full flow. they are getting close to tahrir square. john, i would like to start with you if i could. give us a sense of how bad things appear to be today. >> that live picture you are looking at is a road that leads from tahrir square to the embassy. the security forces have pushed out the line, so there are no custome -- no protesters outside the embassy right now co. they're throwing stones and firebombs at the police, and you can see in the background there lobing if you tear gas grenades and going back to ho
as high tech weapons in the skies over iraq or afghanistan, but over the next decade the use of drone technology by ordinary people is set to increase, far sums are being spent on civilian drone projects and everything from police surveillance to amateur photography. in the united states, congress has told the u.s. airspace regulator to open up north america to drones by 2015. but are we ready for a world in which thousands of drones are patrolling our skies? >> they are the eyes and ears of the armed forces. a decade ago, less than 5% of u.s. military aircraft were unmanned. now 40% have no pilots onboard. many think the f-35 will be the last conventional fighters ever flown by the r.a.f. but the role of the drone is now changing. british skies are about to open up to thousands of civilian drones. who is watching the drone operators and how safe is this new technology? next to an army training zone in the british countryside is a glimpse of how drones could be used in the future. it might not look like the spy planes in afghanistan or yemen, but this is one of the first commercial us
that we live in. the war in iraq is over. american troops have come home. al qaeda has been weakened. and osama bin laden is no more. >> obama took the podium six weeks before the u.s. presidential election. he spent much of his time defending his record on foreign policy. >>> a british territory trying to highlight the suffering of children in syria's civil war. save the children says the violence is causing psychological damage. the charity released a video report to coincide with the start of the general assembly meeting. a spokesperson says many children have seen family members killed. the trauma made boys and girls overaggressive. some are injuring themselves. the spokesperson says children are being caught in the firing line. he says a school in the capital, damascus was bombed tuesday. the video shows children living in tents at a refugee camp in jordan and it highlights other challenges. >> they're even telling us of children being tortured in prison. little children. only 10 years old having their fingernails pulled out, fingers cut off. this is appalling. and it has to sto
resentment of the various foreign wars that are being waged, iraq, for example, the dropo killings, all of that kind of stuff, but i think the anger comes from more profound sources been bet. these are people usually in places where the young men, almost all of them really have no prospects. no jobs. they have very little chance of making a good living for themselves, getting married, so there is a frustration, and that frustration is easily channeled by political leaders. they can be named. it becomes like letting off steam. tavis: we are heading into these presidential debates. one of these debates, it will be dealing with foreign policy, and we have already seen how mr. obama and mr. romney have responded. with libya and other parts of the world. what is your sense that they need to calibrate the situation going forward? >> it is a difficult thing for america, because i think it is very important to hold the line. it is important to say we have some fundamental freedoms in this country that we cherish and that we are not going to bat down from that. it is very important to say that w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)